Camberwell

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Overseas possessions


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CAMBERWELL

Incorporated into : 1965 Southwark

Arms (crest) of Camberwell

Official blazon

Arms : Quarterly Gules and Argent a Cross quarterly between a Well in the first and fourth quarters a Chevron couped between three Cinquefoils in the second and a Lion rampant in the third all counter changed.
Crest : On a Wreath of the Colours in front of a Crosier erect Gules a Hind lodged Argent gutté-de-sang pierced through the neck with an Arrow fessewise Sable.
Motto : 'ALL'S WELL'

Origin/meaning

The arms were officially granted on May 7, 1901.

The well in the first and fourth quarters is a 'canting' allusion to Camberwell and also to the many wells of the district, of which one at least was reputed to have healing properties; the lion rampant is the arms of Robert, Earl of Gloucester, a natural son of Henry I, who was lord of the manor of Peckham; while the chevron and cinquefoils come from the arms of a lord of the manor of Dulwich, Edward Alleyn, the founder of the College.

The lion in the third quarter is from the arms of Scotland; it actually derives from the arms of Robert's father, who added it to his Badge on his marriage to Matilda of Scotland.

The crest of a wounded hart and abbot's crosier represents St. Giles, patron saint of Camberwell, to whom the parish church is dedicated.

The motto is again a 'canting' allusion to Camberwell and is part of the army password "Pass friend and all's well", much used in the Boer War which was being fought when the arms were granted.

Arms (crest) of Camberwell

The arms as used on a JaJa postcard +/- 1905
Arms (crest) of Camberwell

The arms on a Wills's cigarette card, 1906
Arms (crest) of Camberwell

The arms in the Coffee Hag albums +/- 1925


Literature : Scott-Giles, C.W. : Civic heraldry of England and Wales, London, 1932.